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Taking a Full Photo of the Earth Every Day

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This is a really cool visualization of how Planet’s 150+ imaging satellites take a complete satellite photo of the Earth every single day.

Planet Satellites Daily

Every few seconds, the visualization picks a new satellite to track, allowing you to see the location, height, and speed. The satellites are 300 miles from the surface of the Earth moving at about 17,000 mph.

Tags: infoviz   maps   satellite imagery
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jalangle
64 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Hell

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Basically, it's just Satan reading me my own comic for eternity.


Today's News:

Check out our new book!

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jalangle
191 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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jlvanderzwan
191 days ago
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Isn't that more like purgatory though?

This $2.95M Home Used to Be a Library and, Wow, I've Never Wanted Anything More

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Yes, my fellow book lovin' nerds, this house was A FREAKING LIBRARY. READ MORE...
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jalangle
217 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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Remaking the Servant Economy

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Artus_Wolffort_-_The_Scullery_Maid.jpg

Alexis Madrigal looks at the vast body of “Uber-for-X” sharing economy companies and sees something that’s historically new, but very familiar:

The haves and the have-nots might be given new names: the demanding and the on-demand. These apps concretize the wild differences that the global economy currently assigns to the value of different kinds of labor. Some people’s time and effort are worth hundreds of times less than other people’s. The widening gap between the new American aristocracy and everyone else is what drives both the supply and demand of Uber-for-X companies.

The inequalities of capitalist economies are not exactly news. As my colleague Esther Bloom pointed out, “For centuries, a woman’s social status was clear-cut: either she had a maid or she was one.” Domestic servants—to walk the dog, do the laundry, clean the house, get groceries—were a fixture of life in America well into the 20th century. In the short-lived narrowing of economic fortunes wrapped around the Second World War that created what Americans think of as “the middle class,” servants became far less common, even as dual-income families became more the norm and the hours Americans worked lengthened.

What the combined efforts of the Uber-for-X companies created is a new form of servant, one distributed through complex markets to thousands of different people. It was Uber, after all, that launched with the idea of becoming “everyone’s private driver,” a chauffeur for all.

An unkind summary, then, of the past half decade of the consumer internet: Venture capitalists have subsidized the creation of platforms for low-paying work that deliver on-demand servant services to rich people, while subjecting all parties to increased surveillance.

What else is there to say?

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jalangle
222 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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1 public comment
kbrint
211 days ago
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Damned if it isn't convenient, though.

"The sword was pulled from the stone!" "Who put it in there?" "Why?" "Maybe we should follow the person putting the swords away instead."

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"The sword was pulled from the stone!"

"Who put it in there?"

"Why?"

"Maybe we should follow the person putting the swords away instead."


Posted by ASmallFiction on Wednesday, April 4th, 2018 5:15am


1611 likes, 379 retweets
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jalangle
560 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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Daniel Pocock: Do the little things matter?

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In a widely shared video, US Admiral McRaven addressing University of Texas at Austin's Class of 2014 chooses to deliver a simple message: make your bed every day.

A highlight of this talk is the quote The little things in life matter. If you can't do the little things right, you'll never be able to do the big things right.

In the world of free software engineering, we have lofty goals: the FSF's High Priority Project list identifies goals like private real-time communication, security and diversity in our communities. Those deploying free software in industry have equally high ambitions, ranging from self-driving cars to beating the stock market.

Yet over and over again, we can see people taking little shortcuts and compromises. If Admiral McRaven is right, our failure to take care of little things, like how we choose an email provider, may be the reason those big things, like privacy or diversity, appear to be no more than a pie-in-the-sky.

The IT industry has relatively few regulations compared to other fields such as aviation, medicine or even hospitality. Consider a doctor who re-uses a syringe - how many laws would he be breaking? Would he be violating conditions of his insurance? Yet if an IT worker overlooks the contempt for the privacy of Gmail users and their correspondents that is dripping off the pages of the so-called "privacy" policy, nobody questions them. Many people will applaud their IT staff for choices or recommendations like this, because, of course, "it works". A used syringe "just works" too, but who would want one of those?

Google's CEO Eric Schmidt tells us that if you don't have anything to hide, you don't need to worry.

Compare this to the advice of Sun Tzu, author of the indispensable book on strategy, The Art of War. The very first chapter is dedicated to estimating, calculating and planning: what we might call data science today. Tzu unambiguously advises to deceive your opponent, not to let him know the truth about your strengths and weaknesses.

In the third chapter, Offense, Tzu starts out that The best policy is to take a state intact ... to subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Surely this is only possible in theory and not in the real world? Yet when I speak to a group of people new to free software and they tell me "everybody uses Windows in our country", Tzu's words take on meaning he never could have imagined 2,500 years ago.

In many tech startups and even some teams in larger organizations, the oft-repeated mantra is "take the shortcut". But the shortcuts and the things you get without paying anything, without satisfying the conditions of genuinely free software, such as Gmail, frequently involve giving up a little bit of information about yourself: as Sun Tzu puts it, you just have been subdued without fighting.

In one community that has taken a prominent role in addressing the challenges of diversity, one of the leaders recently expressed serious concern that their efforts had been subdued in another way: Gmail's Promotions Tab. Essential emails dispatched to people who had committed to their program were routinely being missed.

I pointed out many people have concerns about Gmail and that I had been having thoughts about simply blocking it at my mail server. It is quite easy to configure a mail server to send an official bounce message, for example, in Postfix, it is just one line in the /etc/postfix/access file:

@gmail.com   REJECT  The person you are trying to contact hasn't accepted Gmail's privacy policy.  Please try sending the email from a regular email provider.

Some communities could go further, refusing to accept Gmail addresses on mailing lists or registration forms: the lesser evil compared to a miserable fate in Promotions Tab limbo.

I was quite astounded at the response: several people complained that this was too much for participants to comply with (the vast majority register with a Gmail address) or that it was even showing all Gmail users contempt (can't they smell the contempt for users in the aforementioned Gmail "privacy" policy?). Nobody seemed to think participants could cope with that and if we hope these people are going to be the future of diversity, that is really, really scary.

Personally, I have far higher hopes for them: just as Admiral McRaven's Navy SEALS are conditioned to make their bed every day at boot camp, people entering IT, especially those from under-represented groups, need to take pride in small victories for privacy and security, like saying "No" each and every time they have the choice to give up some privacy and get something "free", before they will ever hope to accomplish big projects and change the world.

If they don't learn these lessons at the outset, will they ever? If programs just concentrate on some "job skills" and gloss over the questions of privacy and survival in the information age, how can they ever deliver the power shift that is necessary for diversity to mean something?

Come and share your thoughts on the FSFE discussion list (join, thread and reply).

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jalangle
629 days ago
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Seattle, WA
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